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Question

Digilent driver providing only 0.6A at max for single motor. But I require current upto 1.5A how to overcome this problem.

Also there is no braking in motor driver. Is there any option in driver to electrically brake the motor. 

 

Thanks in Advance

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Hi,

How are you powering your motors? Are you using an external power supply?

As for braking, there is no way with this hardware setup to dynamically brake the motors, but there are a few ways that you can emulate braking.

You could use a lower PWM value on the "Mode" pin to induce the motors to run at an effectively lower voltage, consequently lowering their speed and emulating a "braking" effect. Alternatively, you could also just no longer provide any power to the motor by driving the "enable" pin to a logic high voltage state so that the motors would quickly coast to a stop. The fastest way to brake to the motors would be to start running them in the reverse direction that they are currently going in.

Thanks,
JColvin

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I have similar issue that Kamal has.. The current for mine driver runs at about 0.4A with normal load, but clips to 0.2A per motor when the motor is stalled. I was expecting stalled current to to shoot up (approx 5A based on my motor voltage and motor winding resistance) and hoping that the Digilent myrio motor driver will clip it at 1.5A as listed on the specs. That would have provided enough power to overcome larger loads. Never expect the opposite to happen. It drops instead of increasing. Anyone here idea what is going on?

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Hi mospeada,

After looking through the datasheet of the Allegro A4973 that is on the board, my guess is that the chip is getting overheated and entering thermal shutdown since it looks like this particular chip can only dissipate a little under 2 Watts at 25 degrees C. What voltage are you running the motors at since that will give a good indication of the power you're attempting to draw through the chip.

Thanks,
JColvin

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