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omarninopequeno

Pmodmic In Basys2

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Hi omarniopequeno,

 

I personally don't know how you might implement the module in Verilog (I'm a microcontroller guy), but I do know what the 12 output bits mean.

 

The 12 output bits are what the analog-to-digital converter that is present on the PmodMIC send out which represent the data (sound) that was picked up by the microphone in a particular instance of time.

 

Practically speaking, when the MIC picks up some sound, the sound waves activate a component in the microphone which produces a voltage (analog) signal. This voltage signal is then sent to the analog-to-digital converter that is also on the Pmod, which converts the analog signal into a digital signal, in this case 12 digital signals. Since digital signals are simply just high and low voltages, digital signals can be effectively interpreted as a binary code with a high voltage represented as a '1' and a low voltage representing a '0'.

 

The PmodMIC allows these 12 bits to become available to you (the user/ the basys2 in this case) through SPI (serial peripheral interface) with the most significant bit (the largest binary value) becoming available to you first out of the 12 bits of information. However, because of the nature of SPI, the PmodMIC will actually send you four '0' (low voltage) values first before sending the 12 bits of information through SPI.

 

Please let me know if you have any more questions.

 

Thanks,

JColvin

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Hi omarniopequeno,

 

I personally don't know how you might implement the module in Verilog (I'm a microcontroller guy), but I do know what the 12 output bits mean.

 

The 12 output bits are what the analog-to-digital converter that is present on the PmodMIC send out which represent the data (sound) that was picked up by the microphone in a particular instance of time.

 

Practically speaking, when the MIC picks up some sound, the sound waves activate a component in the microphone which produces a voltage (analog) signal. This voltage signal is then sent to the analog-to-digital converter that is also on the Pmod, which converts the analog signal into a digital signal, in this case 12 digital signals. Since digital signals are simply just high and low voltages, digital signals can be effectively interpreted as a binary code with a high voltage represented as a '1' and a low voltage representing a '0'.

 

The PmodMIC allows these 12 bits to become available to you (the user/ the basys2 in this case) through SPI (serial peripheral interface) with the most significant bit (the largest binary value) becoming available to you first out of the 12 bits of information. However, because of the nature of SPI, the PmodMIC will actually send you four '0' (low voltage) values first before sending the 12 bits of information through SPI.

 

Please let me know if you have any more questions.

 

Thanks,

JColvin

This 12 bits represent the wave amplitude or the wave frequency?

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These 12 bits most accurately represent the wave amplitude.   However, it does not represent the entire wave; just a single part of the wave in a particular point in time. 

 

More precisely, the 12 bits that the PmodMIC sends to the system board via SPI represent how much of a full scale signal the system board is receiving. In decimal notation, 12 bits is equivalent to 4096 individual steps. So, if you were operating the PmodMIC at 3.3V, the 12 bits that you would receive would represent what fraction of 3.3V that the microphone is sending out at one particular point in time.

 

Let me know if you have any more questions.

 

Thanks,

JColvin

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