Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'labtoy cmod a7 streaming data recorder function generator'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • News
    • New Users Introduction
    • Announcements
  • Digilent Technical Forums
    • FPGA
    • Digilent Microcontroller Boards
    • Non-Digilent Microcontrollers
    • Add-on Boards
    • Scopes & Instruments
    • LabVIEW
    • FRC
    • Other
  • General Discussion
    • Project Vault
    • Learn
    • Suggestions & Feedback
    • Buy, Sell, Trade
    • Sales Questions
    • Off Topic
    • Educators
    • Technical Based Off-Topic Discussions

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 1 result

  1. An FPGA can be a useful "swiss army knife", but all the nice features aren't easily accessible. Enter "LabToy": A batteries-included collection of utilities, just double-click and go. As the name implies, this isn't meant to compete against "real" test equipment. The main selling point is like a pocket knife - this fits into a shirt pocket and the power tools don't. And speaking of "selling points", it's free to use. So what do we have here: - Digital data: Shows the input state of all pins - Analog data: Readings from the two ADCs, up to about 700 ksps sustained (XADC "simultaneous sampling" mode, phase-accurate between channels) - Streaming data logger: Both analog and digital data can be written to a .vcd file, to be shown in gtkwave. There is no limit to the capture length. - Analog signal generator: 8 fully independent channels, sine, square wave, the usual suspects. Well, the DACs won't win any audiophile awards, but they are usable. - "Programmable" digital LED mode: Configurable pulse width to suppress short glitches, or edge detect with a built-in pulse generator to highlight them. - Analog LED mode: Shows the input value of the ADC in real time Some screenshots: 1k sine / cosine from DAC jumpered to ADC (in gtkwave) The digital signal is the generator's sync output that can be recorded as a digital input. Realtime display of the inputs. With pocket knives in mind ("this button will unlock the large blade, allowing it to be manually returned to its folded position") I decided to keep the screen uncluttered and put descriptions into tooltips. The large displays are the average voltage readings from the ADC. The smaller ones show the digital inputs in groups of four. Generator controls (frequency, minimum voltage, maximum voltage, phase). The voltage scaling is a bit unusual (typically there is "AC magnitude" and "DC offset") but I chose this approach because it shows clearly the limitations of the 0..3.3V output range. Most people will probably leave all this at the default values for a full-scale signal. Data capture Example: The output in gtkwave after I touched a jumper cable to the digital inputs on the DIL connector. +++ DO NOT USE THE +5V OUTPUT P24 FOR THIS KIND OF TEST +++ (3.3 V is available on the PMOD connector, bottom row) The red "undefined" marks flag the first input in an 8-bit group. In this example, they aren't too meaningful, but they can alert me to the fact that no data events have been observed yet. LED control The two numbers give the number of consecutive 1 or 0 samples (at 125 MHz) before a signal change is propagated to the LED. E.g. put 125 million there and it'll take one second after changing the input state for the LED to light / go dark. Those can be used interactively to study an unknown signal. "Level": no further processing ("level" mode and 1 / 1 sample counts is equivalent to directly connecting the LED to the physical input) "Edge" mode generates a brief pulse on signal changes, the LED is dark otherwise. "Invert" flips the input right next to the pin (0 becomes 1, black becomes white and man gets himself killed on the next zebra crossing -DA). How to get it: The file is attached: labToy0v1_beta.exe The installer unpacks a single .exe. Happy hacking! Requirements: Windows 64 bit (!) .NET 4.5 FTDI libraries CMOD A7 35 T (not 15 T). Warnings: Direct access to digital IO pins is an inherently dangerous activity. "PROVIDED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND" means Just That. And beware of the +5V pin. PS: If you try it, kindly let me know whether it works, or what goes wrong.